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CCQ donates quilts for grieving kids

Sandy VickEvery year instructors and students of the Coffee Creek Quilters prison quilting program make quilts for donation to two summer camps for kids who have experienced the death of a loved one.

We make it a quilt “challenge” and this year’s rule was to include the color purple. We vote for our favorites; Sandy Vick earned the most votes in the 2017 challenge with her oh-so-charming appliqued bird quilt.

The quilts will be donated to Camp Erin and Camp Sunrise.

Camp Erin is a national program where young people learn to grieve and heal following the death of a loved one. Funded by the Moyer Foundation and local groups, camps are held in 45 locations in the U.S. and Canada. The camp is free for kids ages 6 to 17. Oregon’s Camp Erin is administered by the Providence Foundation and takes place this year at Camp Kuratli in Boring, OR, August 11-13.

Camp Sunrise is open to kids ages 7-14 residing in Central Oregon who have experienced the loss of a loved one. Structured games, music, art, stories, and other therapies teach bereaved campers about grief and how to understand their feelings. Administered by Hospice of Redmond, the camp is offered at no charge to up to 40 kids each year who live in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties. This year the three-day, two-night camp will be  held the weekend of June 16-18.

Quilt donations

CCQ donates quilts to camps for kids

Zack's quiltEight year old Zack’s quilt (to his right in the picture) was one of 45 submitted for the annual Coffee Creek Quilters challenge on June 4th. Zack participated along with his grandmother, our own Judy Dunham.

In past years all challenge quilts have been donated to Camp Erin, a summer camp for kids who have experienced bereavement. This year we also donated to Camp Sunrise, a project of Hospice of Redmond. Another change this year was to give quilts made by students in our prison quilting program along with instructor-made quilts. A total of fifty-six quilts were donated to the two camps.

“Providing quilts to bereaved children has been a long term commitment for Coffee Creek Quilters instructors. The students voted that they would like to contribute also so this year is the first time student quilts have been donated to bereaved children. It is exciting to expand our outreach to Central Oregon especially since the students come from all over the state,” said CCQ President Linda Downey.

Camp Erin is a national program where young people learn to grieve and heal following the death of a loved one. Funded by the Moyer Foundation and local groups, camps are held in 45 locations in the U.S. and Canada. The camp is free for kids aged 6 to 17. Oregon’s Camp Erin is administered by the Providence Foundation and takes place this year at Camp Kuratli in Boring, OR, August 12-14.

Camp Sunrise is offered to kids ages 7-14 residing in Central Oregon who have experienced the loss of a loved one. Structured games, music, art, stories, and other therapies teach bereaved campers about grief and how to understand their feelings. The camp is open to up to 40 kids each year who reside in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties and is offered at no charge. The three-day, two-night camp is held the third weekend of June.

News & Events, Quilt donations

A sweet story from Medford

Student quiltCoffee Creek Quilters donates around 100 student-made quilts every year to a variety of organizations. Last week we heard a sweet story about one of our donation quilts.

This particular quilt was one of twenty-one donated to CASA of Jackson County in Medford. Diane Campbell, an instructor in our Thursday class had delivered the quilts in January 2015. Last week one of Diane’s students told her that one of her dorm mates had received a photo of her grandbaby who is in foster care in Medford. In the picture, the baby was wrapped in one of our quilts. The label was visible and showed the quilt was made by another dorm mate who is a good friend of the grandma.

We instructors were touched by the story. Mary Shiffer, an instructor in our Wednesday class summed it up nicely for us: “This is a lovely story, proving the interconnectedness of humanity. What we do individually with CCQ is extremely important. I cannot solve the ills of our world by myself but I can change the experiences and attitude of one woman at a time. For each of these women, what they learn about giving, receiving, working hard, sharing, helping, laughing, crying, courage, trusting and more than I could ever name, changes the world for her and also for me. This story reminds me why I even give up Wednesday night Winter Hawks hockey games to be at Coffee Creek. For me, I remember the Christopher Movement motto, ‘It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness.'”

Quilt donations